paintings by jackie dorage
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"Chinese Softshell Turtle"
"K-Pg Boundary"
"Toxoplasma!"
"Silkworms"
"Dung beetle"
"Marshlands"
"Elephants"
"Fireant Raft"
"Sheepdog and Fairy Penguins"
"Pink Pigeon"
"Waiting for Salmon"
"The Cormorant and the Flightless Cormorant"
"Midnight Meeting"
"War Pigeons"
"The Introspective Langur of Kashmir"

"Chinese Softshell Turtle"

"K-Pg Boundary"

"The layer of star-dust, a relic of the asteroid that decimated the dinosaurs over 60 million years ago, sits sliced and shuffled into our ground, bookmarking geologic time, reminding us of our blind kinship with the universe, and flippantly noting the irrepressible facets of life."

 

To read more about this painting on my blog, click here....

"Toxoplasma!"

"Silkworms"

70in x 52in oil on canvas

 Fall 2013

From birth to death, Silkworms bodies and abilities assist us, feed us, clothe us, create for us, and invent with us--the domestication process in its most inclusive form.  

 

To read my blog post about Silkworms, click here

"Dung beetle"

24 x 26in oil on canvas

 Summer 2013

The Dung beetle is the only animal known to navigate by using the dim jagged scar of the Milky Way Galaxy.   But, with words like "poop" and "bug",  our own harmful and pivotal biases can mean the difference between research and dead-air, conservation and baseless extinction.  With over 400,000 species of beetle in the world imagine the conservation efforts that could come from thinking of bugs like we think of mammals.  

 

To read my blog post about Dung beetles, click here.

 

 

"Marshlands"

 14in x 18in oil on canvas

 Summer 2013

 Pulsing oceanic tides sift through coastal marshlands before passing into our waterways.  Calm against the horizon,  the spongy filtering strip protects us from oceanic forces and houses an ecosystem bustling and thriving beneath the placid surface. 

 

"Elephants"

Oil on canvas 40in x 28in

Summer 2013

In the noise of the world--economics, national interests, international codes, sovereignty, trade regulations, government, and politics-- is a species that is struggling.

There’s a sad calm that comes from being too big to hide and a harsh isolation of species under threat.  

 

To read my blog posts on "Elephants", click here

 

"Fireant Raft"

16in x 20in

Oil on Canvas

Winter 2012

Occasionally, the Amazon jungle has enough flooding to destroy lengthy networks of local fire ant tunnels.  So, the instinctually mechanized creatures grasp each other with mandible, claw, and a force 400 times their body weight, forming a tight, elastic-like raft up to three feet in diameter.  Geometrically perfect air bubbles keep even the ants on the bottom afloat and, acting like a super-organism, the pod rotates allowing bubbles to refresh and ants to adjust.

They will finally reach land, unload, and start a new colony wherever that may be.

 

To read my blog post about the Fire Ant Raft, click here

"Sheepdog and Fairy Penguins"

36in x 54in oil on canvas

September 2012

When foxes found their way to Middle Island in 2005, the endangered Fairy Penguin population went from 1,000 to 10.

“It’s like salt-and-vinegar chips to foxes, I reckon”, said local chicken farmer, Mr. Marsh.  To save the tasty blue birds, Mr. Marsh  put his Maremma sheepdog on the island hoping that they would keep watch, rather than eat, the Fairy Penguins.  Since his dogs began patrolling the island Fairy Penguin numbers have rebounded, proving the first case of environmental protection through another species, successful.

 

To read my blog post about the Sheepdog and Fairy Penguins, click here

"Pink Pigeon"

18in x 18in oil on canvas

Spring 2012

In 1991, only 10 rare Pink Pigeon’s existed on the island of Mauritius, home of the famed Dodo bird.   With the help of naturalist Gerald Durrell, who felt obligated to redeem the Dodo’s legacy, there are now 360 in 75 different locations.

"As we approached the wire, they peered at us in the mildly interested, oafish way that pigeons have, and then, dismissing us from what passed for their minds, they fell into a doze. I felt that even though their rarity made them of great biological and avicultural importance, one could hardly say that they had personalities that inspired one."


--Gerald Durrell, excerpt from "Pink Pigeons and Golden Bats"

 

To read my blog post on "Pink Pigeon", click here

"Waiting for Salmon"

36in x 26in oil on canvas

Fall 2012

Every year in Alaska, starting around spring, salmon begin their journey upstream to spawn.  They bring nutrients from the ocean through the web of streams etched into Alaska's coast, and into the mainland.  There, they are the source of fat and protein for countless predators like bears, wolves, otters, seals, and eagles.  Then, their bodies decompose, leaving minerals to soak the soil and seep through the watershed dispersing nutrients and sustaining the Alaska wilderness.  In essence, Alaska is a salmon-based ecosystem.

The La Niña weather system of 2010-2011 cooled the ocean and caused this years salmon run to be months later than usual.  Bears paced along the shoreline day after day and slowly began losing muscle mass.  Eagles sat in trees, searching for movement downstream.  Some predators went to find food elsewhere, like clams and crabs that are less fatty and less abundant, but most waited.  


Alaska sat tense and still, waiting for salmon.

 

To read my blog post about "Waiting for Salmon", click here

 

"The Cormorant and the Flightless Cormorant"

28in x 31in oil on canvas

Spring 2012


Hundreds and thousands of years after the common Cormorant found itself on the benign shores of the Galapagos, it slowly began evolving to accommodate its new home.  Its feathers grew softer, thicker  and more fur-like, its  bone density increased and, most noticeably, it developed short, stubby, un-usable wings.  Once members of the same flock, they are now distant, and strikingly different, cousins.

 

To read my blog post on transitional species, click here

"Midnight Meeting"

 34in x 24in oil on wood panel

Winter 2011

"If you took the city of Tokyo and turned it upside down and shook it, you would be amazed at the animals that would fall out. It would pour more than cats and dogs, I tell you. Boa constrictors, Komodo dragons, crocodiles, piranhas, ostriches, wolves, lynx, wallabies, manatees, porcupines, orang-utans, wild boar--that's the sort of rainfall you could expect on your umbrella."

--Yann Martel, "Life of Pi"

"War Pigeons"

 36in x 36in oil on wood panel

May 2011

  • G.I. Joe saved thousands of men by delivery the message that British soldiers had captured the town of Calvi Vecchia, Italy--just in time for allied forces not to begin bombing.

  • After being shot, attacked by a German hawk , hit by shrapnel, and receiving 22 stitches, Mary of Exeter continued transporting important information from England to France for 5 years.

  • Paddy was the first to deliver the news of the D’Day Invasion.

"…you come back and you open the loft and there they all are, you know, all sitting on their perches going 'cooo-cooo' and you just long to grab one by the scruff of the neck and say 'how do you do it?' but so far, obviously, they haven't told us."

 

--Charles Walcott, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University

"The Introspective Langur of Kashmir"

24in x 16in oil on wood panel

Fall 2011


For decades, an environmental paradise went through the traumas of war, while high in the mountains the Gray Langur of Kashmir, also known as the Hanuman langur named after the sacred Hindu monkey god, sat--waiting, listening, hesitating.

"Chinese Softshell Turtle"
"K-Pg Boundary"
"Toxoplasma!"
"Silkworms"
"Dung beetle"
"Marshlands"
"Elephants"
"Fireant Raft"
"Sheepdog and Fairy Penguins"
"Pink Pigeon"
"Waiting for Salmon"
"The Cormorant and the Flightless Cormorant"
"Midnight Meeting"
"War Pigeons"
"The Introspective Langur of Kashmir"